Lone Wolf: a review

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                  Lone Wolf is an emotional novel with the themes of family, trust and independency running strongly throughout; the audience is forced to take sides between a family feud. Each sibling wants their father’s condition to be dealt with in different ways. Cara, the youngest of the two, wants to care for her father after his car accident, yet her elder brother Edward thinks it is more ethical to switch off the life support and leave him to his peace.

                   The problem is then taken to a court case, and the audience sympathises with both of the siblings. Cara is a minor, and this is why her pleas were not accounted for, whereas Edward is old enough to make his own decisions, and after having been given permission to say ‘he wants to die’ a few years previously, the courts granted him the decision to terminate Luke Warren’s life support.

                   This novel entails both sides of the story, giving the audience a huge tug at their heart strings as they understand Cara’s reasoning for wanting to keep Luke alive; he was the only family she had left, and she felt like a stranger in her mother’s new life with her new family. Cara’s argument against her brother making the decision was that he hadn’t lived with them for 6 years, so therefore Edward cannot be allowed to hold the responsibility of his father’s life, according to Cara.

                   While reading Lone Wolf, I found that I was captivated by the story line and Cara’s connection to her father moved me, while I discovered the secrets hidden within their family which had caused Edward to leave all those years ago. The deception between the family is revealed to the readers and we are hit with the shock factor of the pain in which this family has endured. Luke Warren’s obsession with his wolves placed a massive strain on his first family, and Edward soon discovered that he was having meaningless affairs. The night Edward left, was the night he discovered Luke’s antics, having gone to find his dad to tell him he is gay. Once he returned home, his mother just assume that it hadn’t gone well, and Edward left home, only to return 6 years later for his father’s accident.

                   The emotional elements in this novel are clearly displayed throughout each paragraph; each line of text is swimming with heart and emotion. Jodi Picoult has put her entire being into this book, just as she does with every other novel she has written. Jodi has a specific writing technique, that makes her novels unique and with a huge depth of emotion. The lingering cliff hangers she leaves at the end of chapters and sections in the novel give the audience the shock factor that her books so greatly deserve.

                   Overall, Lone Wolf is one of my favourite Jodi Picoult reads yet, and I would give it a total of 5 out of 5 stars. The emotional levels in the novel just overwhelmed me and I felt completely connected to each and every character, the power of her words are inspirational and deeply moving.

                   

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